Tuesday, January 26, 2021

69-Lucky Scoop 13

Lucky number thirteen! That's where we're at today, the thirteenth random sampling of Christmas music downloaded from The Internet Archive and shared by me.  The thirteenth set, so thirteen songs, most of which were only recently archived, but I'm still on the case trying to keep the season going as long as possible. I grabbed the one shown above strictly because it is not the same Alex Paterson that's behind the ambient techno band The Orb, but I thought it interesting that they shared a name. And the very last record below is the second version of Parade Of The Wooden Soldiers that I've shared by The Lady in Blue, only this one doesn't specifically call her out as June Winters. Odd, that. Maybe it's not her, but it sure sounds like her. And it's definitely a different recording from the previous one.  Mysteries abound in the world of old Christmas music. Oh, and I forgot to mention yesterday that it was two months since I began the Christmas season around here on the day before Thanksgiving. This has got to be a record for longevity of the seasonal celebration here at Ernie (Not Bert)!  Glad you're still along for the ride.  Now, on to the download!

MEGA













9 comments:

Buster said...

I think I read a long time ago that Mabel Mercer introduced "The Twelve Days of Christmas," which has a folk origin, into popular music. I believe Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters did the real damage a few years after this Mercer record came out.

Anyway, this is the first time I've seen the Mercer 78. Thanks!

Ernie said...

That Mabel Mercer is the longest 78 I've seen from that era. I think one side is almost 4 minutes and the other side actually went over 4:00! (I've seen longer ones from later on, but it may have been spoken word stuff.) When they recorded it at IA, they didn't turn up the levels, so there wasn't much there to work with. And the first version I grabbed seemed to start playing before the record was up to speed, so I had to go back and grab a different take. I think it came out OK for all the issues.

I shared a version by her during a Christmas in July some time ago, I need to see if it's the same...

Buster said...

I wonder why they didn't put it out on a 12 inch disk.

petlod said...

Ernie, I never would have guessed there would be a reference to The Orb in one of your posts... They were a fave at the time of their initial heyday.

Ernie said...

Buster-I don't see too many 12" 78s on minor labels. I'm sure they exist, but it must have been quite the investment for a pop song. :)

Pete-Yep, been a fan since the KLF-Chill Out days. Not as much anymore, but at the time, I was a big fanboy. :)

MOQChoir said...

Continuing to enjoy the collections, very much appreciating the seasonal items and non-seasonal tangents, including the Orb reference. That led me down an entertaining rabbit hole for a couple of hours. Of that approximate genre, I'm more into Eno's Ambient content. "Music for Airports" has been a fave for years, and I enjoyed Hoenig's Northern Wasteland release nearly as much. That one is really great music for road trips.

Ernie said...

Perhaps I struck a chord with the Orb reference. I'll admit that even after a lot of trying, I couldn't really get into Eno. There were some things I liked, but as a whole it just put me to sleep, and not in a good way. There was some older stuff that Virgin collected up on a series of four double discs that I enjoyed very much, but the name of the series escapes me now. A Brief History of Ambient, I think that was it. :)

MOQChoir said...

"Ambient 1: A Brief History of Ambient," 1993. Now I gotta look for that one. Thanks (in the best possible way), Ernie. Also for all this seasonal content. MAN! Some of this stuff is really great!

MOQChoir said...
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