Saturday, May 07, 2022

2022 At 78 RPM-Part 19

Another week has gone by in a wink and it's time for another deep dip of Christmas music from The Internet Archive. I haven't touched the pile since last week, so there's probably no new artists in the share today, just the flip sides of things you've already heard, or things I finished up a month ago. I've been working on a special project for Christmas in hopes of actually getting something done in the next six months. Some things take a long time to bring to fruition, especially when you're too lazy for your own good. You have to strike when the motivation hits you, and I've been unusually energetic about Christmas the past two weeks. Anyhow, you'll have to wait and see about that come Christmas. In the meantime, here are twenty more great songs that you've probably never heard before, or at least these versions. It's a good batch of stuff!

MEGA

Also of note, I heard back from the folks at The Great 78 Project, and they tell me they're going to redo all the bad rips that they could find. They do take this archiving stuff seriously, and it's a lot of effort to go back and do things twice. Glad that they were receptive to my notes. And my patched up fridge with the barn door hinges is still running like a champ. We even put all the pictures back up on it. Keeping my fingers crossed and my tax refund in the bank!




















14 comments:

Buster said...

Another splendid group from my favorite Christmas curator.

I have been collecting records since I was six, and I can't say I've ever seen a record of typing set to music. Did John Scott Trotter get tired of accompanying Bing?

Laurie said...

I love the Christmas music but I'm here for the appliance updates.

JustaJeepGuy said...


I saw the song from Petula Clark and I had no idea she recorded as long ago as the 78 RPM age. She will be 90 years old in November. Still singing too, I guess.

Anonymous said...

Thanks again

Ernie said...

Thanks all!

Buster-I assume it was part of a training set. There was a scene in Mrs. Maisel where her friend went to typing school, and I imagine it was a lot like that. :)

Laurie-In that case, you'll be happy to know the oven got cleaned recently, and it's gonna keep working forever. Been here 17-18 years and never cleaned the oven. ;)

Jeepster-Me, either. Very little Christmas music out there from Pet, and I certainly didn't expect to see anything from before her 60's hitmaking days.

Mac said...

Nice grouping here kind sir - had a few already but your copies always seem better - I know you have the programs to clean up things and obviously know how to use them - that is something I think a lot of people don't know that you do - well done

I did not get a chance to comment on two weeks but that was a real crackin' good group - when I first listened to the Pupppet parade from the German band I thought I had heard that somewhere before - took me a while to recall but is way close to Colonel Hathi's March from the Jungle book - that one is slower for sure but dang some tune for sure - way to go Disney reaching back a decade for that

Thanks again, Mac

rev.b said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rev.b said...

I'm fascinated to see how long that fridge with the barn hinges will last. Are you taking bets" I wager it'll last three years, if not longer.

Lee Hartsfeld said...

Thanks, Ernie. I mostly enjoyed them, save for the Clark side with the kids yelling--no way. Also surprised that dialect humor survived all the way into 1946 (the Manor 78). Or, maybe not. (That 78 seems to be very uncommon, btw.) Otherwise, very fun stuff!

Ernie said...

Thanks again for all the comments!

Mac-I don't really spend a lot of time on the audio cleaning, it's kinda something I do on autopilot lately. The IA does a good job with cleaning off the shellac, the ripping and the EQ, there's not much left for me to do. ClickRepair does a wonderful job, I think it's the biggest change I make. And I find that a quick fade-in at the beginning and longer one at the end help. Lots of people leave the noise at the beginning and the end, and that seems distracting to me. I don't notice it so much during the song, but it really jumps out during the silence at the beginning and end.

Rev-I'm sure I could get five, but I suspect there's going to be pressure to go ahead and replace it before it dies suddenly.

Lee-I don't know why, but every version of Where Did My Snowman Go I can think of features the kids yelling along. Must be written into the libretto or something.

Ravel said...

Now I remember why I didn't have the Pet Clark song.
Maybe we should try to use a program to cut the shouting bunch...

On another note, it is fun to see the records with CKVL (radio) stickers.
This is from Quebec, where I am.

Thanks again for all you do (cleaning a lot I guess before posting).

Ernie said...

There have been a lot of records showing up at the Internet Archive recently with that CKVL call sign. I'm guessing the radio station or whoever inherited their 78's donated then to the archive. There's been some good stuff in there, possibly because I'm unfamiliar with Canadian releases. :)

Ravel said...

The CKVL radio station was AM with a lot of talk. And opinion with the people phoning in. It was still around in my teens, so late 70's. I remember the sound it had...
If I'm not mistaken, Internet Archive is American so I suppose somebody gave them files and pictures ? I don't know how it works.
The records you got there are clearly made in Quebec (Montreal) for those little 7'' Pierrot. There was an RCA studio in town.
The Pierrot are rather easy to find here (if you look in 78s and 45's) but most of the time in terrible state of use. And Peter Pan with a lot of Christmas stuff. I have some.
OK. If CKVL talked a lot, I write a lot :-)
Good evenin' to you.

Ernie said...

I'm guessing CKVL was not all talk back in the '50s which is when these records originated. And it's doubtful the station kept all the old records when they changed formats, or when LP needles came into the game. They may have sold them all at the time, and that person has kept the collection together until it was donated to the IA. Or maybe they donated the old stacks to the IA themselves.

Ah, looks like the records came from the collection of Bowling Green State University, who donated them to the Archive. So they must have gotten them from CKVL somehow.