Saturday, August 23, 2008

Honeysuckle


We went to the Carolina Raptor Center in North Carolina today, and they had something I'd never seen before. You're looking at an albino red-shouldered hawk! I thought they had a cockatoo in a pen when I first walked up, and then I saw the beak. This girl was beautiful. They say she's not a full albino, and she did have a few dark feathers on the back of her head, but everything else was white. I don't think you'll ever see one of these in the wild.

By the way, Honeysuckle is her name, in case you were wondering where that title came from.

4 comments:

uncreative said...

just because I can be a total bitch LOL :)

Honeysuckle was found in Mooresville, North Carolina and brought to Carolina Raptor Center on December 10, 1988. A local family was walking along a path in the woods when Honeysuckle fell out of a bush as they passed by. Her exam at Carolina Raptor Center revealed a fractured wing, that was most likely the result of a gunshot wound. The injury had occurred 4 to 5 days earlier and Honeysuckle was emaciated and very lethargic. After several days of carefully monitored treatment, Honeysuckle regained her strength and appetite, however her wing injury was not repairable and she had to have the wing amputated. When Honeysuckle first arrived at Carolina Raptor Center, her coloration was fairly typical of a red-tailed hawk, although a third of her feathers were lighter than average. However, with each molt (the normal process of shedding and regrowing feathers) Honeysuckle grew more and more white feathers. She is now a referred to as a partial albino, with beautiful white feathers. She is not technically an albino because her eyes and a few feathers retain pigment. This naturally-occurring genetic condition, known as leucism, would have probably meant her doom in the wild, making her more vulnerable because of her lack of camouflage. Honeysuckle's unusual coloration makes her popular with photographers and visitors. She is a permanent resident and an important part of Carolina Raptor Center's education programs.

http://www.carolinaraptorcenter.org/resident.php#res24

Anonymous said...

http://www.carolinaraptorcenter.org/resident.php

uncreative said...

IF ONLY WE'D KNOWN!!

Photowild is Sat Oct 11 and Sun Oct 12 from 8AM to noon. For those of you who have not done this event it is a wonderful opportunity to photograph raptors outside their enclosures without wire separating you from the bird. The birds are set up in a very natural setting and you can get to within a few feet of them. This is an annual fundraising event with all of the proceeds going to the birds. Photographers are invited to submit up to 3 of their photographs for a photo contest. There will be an exhibition and benefit auction for all submitted photos with proceeds benefiting the Carolina Raptor Center. This is your chance to get some incredible photos and a chance to display your work to others. If you don`t choose to submit any work the silent auction is a great opportunity to get some nice prints at a very reasonable price! Hope to see you there!

Ernie said...

C'est la vie. Put it on the calendar for next year. Maybe it will be cooler by October...